Links Worth Sharing: What Makes People Successful

Data for Breakfast

Boris Gorelik

The renown network scientist, Albert-László Barabási, has been applying scientific methods to study the factors that make people successful. Science has published an intriguing paper called Quantifying reputation and success in art written by Prof. Barabási and his collaborators. Prof. Barabási talks about the findings of his research in an interview with The HumanCurrent podcast.

(The featured image is a portion from Figure 1 in Fraiberger et al., Science 10.1126/science.aau7224 (2018)).

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Useful redundancy — when using colors is not completely useless

The maximum data-ink ratio principle implies that one should not use colors in their graphs if the graph is understandable without the colors. The fact that you can do something, such as adding colors, doesn’t mean you should do it. I know it. I even have a dedicated tag on this blog for that. Sometimes, however, consistent use of colors serves as a useful navigation tool in a long discussion. Keep reading to learn about the justified use of colors.

Pew Research Center is a “is a nonpartisan American fact tank based in Washington, D.C. It provides information on social issues, public opinion, and demographic trends shaping the United States and the world.” Recently, I read a report prepared by the Pew Center on the religious divide in the Israeli society. This is a fascinating report. I recommend reading without any connection to data visualization.

But this post does not deal with the Isreali society but with graphs and colors.

Look at the first chart in that report. You may see a tidy pie chart with several colored segments. 

Pie chart: Religious composition of Israeli society. The chart uses several colored segments

Aha! Can’t they use a single color without losing the details? Of course the can! A monochrome pie chart would contain the same information:

Pie chart: Religious composition of Israeli society. The chart uses monochrome segments

In most of the cases, such a transformation would make a perfect sense. In most of the cases, but not in this report. This report is a multipage research document packed with many facts and analyses. The pie chart above is the first graph in that report that provides a broad overview of the Israeli society. The remaining of this report is dedicated to the relationships between and within the groups represented by the colorful segments in that pie chart. To help the reader navigating through this long report, its authors use a consistent color scheme that anchors every subsequent graph to the relevant sections of the original pie chart.

All these graphs and tables will be readable without the use of colors. Despite the fact that the colors here are redundant, this is a useful redundancy. By using the colors, the authors provided additional information layers that make the navigation within the document easier. I learned about the concept of useful redundancy from “Trees, Maps, and Theorems” by Jean-luc Dumout. If you can only read one book about data communication, it should be this book.

Microtext Line Charts

Why adding text labels to graph lines, when you can build graph lines using text labels? On microtext lines

richardbrath

Tangled Lines

Line charts are a staple of data visualization. They’ve existed at least since William Playfair and possibly earlier. Like many charts, they can be very powerful and also have their limitations. One limitation is the number of lines that can be displayed. One line works well: you can see trend, volatility, highs, lows, reversals. Two lines provides opportunity for comparison. 5 lines might be getting crowded. 10 lines and you’re starting to run out of colors. But what if the task is to compare across a peer group of 30 or 40 items? Lines get jumbled, there aren’t enough discrete colors, legends can’t clearly distinguish between them. Consider this example looking at unemployment across 37 countries from the OECD: which country had the lowest unemployment in 2010?

unemployment_plain

Tooltips are an obvious way to solve this, but tooltips have problems – they are much slower than just shifing visual attention…

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On the importance of perspective

Stalin was a relatively short man, his height was 1.65 m. Khrushchev was even shorter, his height was 1.60. It seems that the difference wasn’t enough for the official Soviet propaganda of that time. Take a look at this photo. We can clearly see that Stalin is taller than Khrushchev.

stalin.png

Do you notice something strange? Take a look at the windows in the background. I added horizontal and vertical guides for your convenience.

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 8.38.08

Now, look what happens when we fix the horizontal and vertical lines

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 8.39.03

Now, Khrushchev is still shorter than Stalin but not by that much.

איך אומרים דאטה ויזואליזיישן בעברית?

This post is written in Hebrew about a Hebrew issue. I won’t translate it to English.

אני מלמד data visualization בשתי מכללות בישראלבמכללת עזריאלי להנדסה בירושלים ובמכון הטכנולוגי בחולון. כשכתבתי את הסילבוס הראשון שלי הייתי צריך למצוא מונח ל־data visualization וכתבתיהדמיית נתונים״ אומנם זה הזכיר לי קצת תהליך של סימולציה, אבל האופציה האחרת ששקלתי היתה ״דימות״ וידעתי שהיא שמורה ל־imaging, דהיינו תהליך של יצירת דמות או צורה של עצם, בעיקר בעולם הרפואה.

הבנתי שהמונח בעייתי בשיעור הראשון שהעברתי. מסתברששניים מארבעת הסטודנטים שהגיעו לשיעור חשבו שקורס ״הדמיית נתונים בתהליך מחקר ופיתוח״ מדבר על סימולציות.

מתישהו שמעתי מחבר של חבר שהמונח הנכון ל־visualization זה הדמאה, אבל זה נשמע לי פלצני מדי, אז השארתי את ה־״הדמיה״ בשם הקורס והוספתי “data visualization” בסוגריים.

היום, שלוש שנים אחרי ההרצאה הראשונה שהעברתי, ויומיים לפני פתיחת הסמסטר הבא, החלטתי לגגל (יש מילה כזאת? יש!) את התשובה. ומה מסתבר? עלון ״למד לשונך״ מס׳ 109 של האקדמיה ללשון עברית שיצא לאור בשנת 2015 קובע שהמונח ל־visualization הוא הַחְזָיָה. לא יודע מה אתכם, אבל אני לא משתגע על החזיה. עוד משהו שאני לא משתגע עליו הוא שבתור הדוגמא להחזיה, האקדמיה החלטיה לשים תרשים עוגה עם כל כך הרבה שגיאות!

Screen Shot 2018-10-23 at 20.35.52

נראה לי שאני אשאר עם הדמיה. ויקימילון מרשה לי.

נ.ב. שמתם לב שפוסט זה השתמשתי במקף עברי? אני מאוד אוהב את המקף העברי.

Innumeracy

Innumeracy is “inability to deal comfortably with the fundamental notions of number and chance”.
I which there was a better term for “innumeracy”, a term that would reflect the importance of analyzing risks, uncertainty, and chance. Unfortunately, I can’t find such a term. Nevertheless, the problem is huge. In this long post, Tom Breur reviews many important aspects of “numeracy”.

Data, Analytics and beyond

Tom Breur

21 October 2018

It has long been known that the general public is sometimes remarkably out of tune with math and numbers. In 1988 mathematician John Allan Paulos wrote a classic “Innumeracy” that is chockful of striking examples of misinterpretation of numeric evidence. Paulos refers to innumeracy as “… inability to deal comfortably with the fundamental notions of number and chance …” Personally, I consider it the mathematical equivalent to illiteracy. Another classic from Paulos is “A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper” (1995) which contains a lot of satire, debunking ridiculous claims in the press. It highlights more spectacular examples of innumeracy.

Paulos illustrates innumeracy with lighthearted anecdotes and many common, everyday scenarios. These examples highlight how readers might be fooled by misleading quantitative evidence. His examples span diverse topics like probability and coincidence, misguessing extremely small or very large numbers, pseudoscience and superstition…

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Working Remotely and the Virtue of Aggressive Transparency

Excellent post by my colleague Simon Ouderkirk on working in a distributed company. It’s a three-year-old post. I wonder how I missed it.

Simon Ouderkirk

public-domain-images-free-stock-photos-bicycle-bike-black-and-white

One of the things that it has taken me quite a long time to figure out, when it comes to this remote work gig, is this idea I’ve taken to calling aggressive transparency.

I’ve been chewing on this idea quite a lot, and in chatting with my team and other folks whose opinions I respect, I think I’m starting to feel like it’s something I should articulate in greater detail.

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Data visualization in right-to-left languages

Line chart that uses Arabic text and numerals

If you speak Arabic or Farsi, I need your help. If you don’t speak, share this post with someone who does.

Right-to-left (RTL) languages such as Hebrew, Arabic, and Farsi are used by roughly 1.8 billion people around the world. Many of them consume data in their native languages. Nevertheless, I have never seen any research or study that explores data visualization in RTL languages. Until a couple of days ago, when I saw this interesting observation by Nick Doiron “Charts when you read right-to-left“.

I teach data visualization in Israeli colleges. Whenever a student asks me RTL-related questions, I always answer something like “it’s complicated, let’s not deal with that”. Moreover, in the assignments, I even allow my students to submit graphs in English, even if they write the report in Hebrew.

Nick’s post made me wonder about data visualization do’s and don’ts in RTL environments. Should Hebrew charts differ from Arabic or Farsi? What are the accepted practices?

If you speak Arabic or Farsi, I need your help. If you don’t speak, share this post with someone who does. I want to collect as many examples of data visualization in RTL languages. Links to research articles are more than welcome. You can leave your comments here or send them to boris@gorelik.net.

Thank you.

 

The image at the top of this post is a modified version of a graph that appears in the post that I cite. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to find the original publication.

Can error correction cause more error? (The answer is yes)

This is an interesting thought experiment. Suppose that you have some appliance that acts in a normally distributed way. For example, a nerf gun. Let’s say now that you aim and fire the gun. What happens if you miss by some amount of X? Should you correct your aim in the opposite direction? My intuition says “yes.” So does the intuition of many other people with whom I talked about this problem. However, when we start thinking about this problem, we realize that the intuition is wrong. Since we aim the gun, our assumption should be that the deviation is zero. A single observation is not sufficient to reject this assumption. By continually adjusting the data generating process based on a single observation, we reduce the precision (increase the dispersion).
Below is a simulation of adjusted and non-adjusted processes (the code is here). The broader spread of the adjusted data (blue line) is evident.

Two curves. Blues: high dispersion of values when adjustments are performed after every observation. Orange: smaller dispersion when no adjustments are done.

Due to the nature of the normal random variable, a single large accidental deviation can cause an extreme “correction,” which in turn will create a prolonged period of highly inaccurate points. This is precisely what you see in my simulation.
The moral of this simple experiment is that you shouldn’t let a single affect your actions.