Data visualization is not only dots, bars, and pies

Look at this wonderful piece of data visualization (taken from here). If you know the terms “tertiary structure” and “glycan”, there is NO way you miss the message that the author of this figure wanted to convey. Also, note how using appropriate colors in the title, the authors got rid of graph legend.

StellarGraph — another promising network analysis library for Python and Scala

Network (graph) analysis is a complicated topic. There are several tools available for this task with different pros and cons. Recently, I stumbled upon another tool StellarGraph. StellarGraph authors claim to provide excellent performance; NumPy, Pandas, TensorFlow integration, an impressive set of algorithms, inter compatibility with Neo4j (THE graph database); and much more. The documentation looks Continue reading StellarGraph — another promising network analysis library for Python and Scala

Logarithmic scale misinforms. Period

Being a data scientist and a self-proclaimed data visualization expert, I like using log scale graphs when I find them appropriate. However, as a speaker and a communicator, I refrain from using them in presentations as much as possible. From my experience as a data visualization lecturer, I noticed that even “technical” struggle grasping the concept of log scale graphs.

Visualising Odds Ratio — Henry Lau

Besides being a freelancer data scientist and visualization expert, I teach. One of the toughest concepts to teach and to visualize is odds ratio. Today, I stumbled upon a very interesting post that deals exactly with that

Online data science conference on May, 28

NDR is a family of machine learning/data science conferences. Their next conference will be held online on May, 28 and the agenda looks great. Now, I’m not super objective here, because I’m presenting at NDR July event. But look at the topics, what an impressive selection!

Finally We May Have a Path to the Fundamental Theory of Physics… and It’s Beautiful — Stephen Wolfram Blog

OK, so Stephen Wolfram (a mega celebrity in the computational intelligence world and, among other things a physicist) claims that he may have found a path to the Fundamental Theory of Physics. The blog post is long, and I hope to be able to finish reading it in a week or two. The accompanying technical Continue reading Finally We May Have a Path to the Fundamental Theory of Physics… and It’s Beautiful — Stephen Wolfram Blog

The missing graves

Today, Israel marks Holocaust Day. Many words have been written about the Holocaust, and I want to write about missing graves.If you visit a Jewish cemetery, you might see a lot of gravestones with additional memorial plates. I took this picture in the Chișinău (Kishinev) Jewish cemetery. Burial of the deceased is considered the final Continue reading The missing graves

Why is forecasting s-curves hard?

Constance Crozier (@clcrozier) shared an interesting simulation in which she tried to fit a sigmoid curve (s-curve) to predict a plateau in a time-series. It took me a while to find the reference for a paper that explains why.

The cardiovascular safety of antiobesity drugs—analysis of signals in the FDA Adverse Event Report System Database

I am glad and proud to announce that a paper which I helped to prepare and publish is available on the Nature’s group site. The paper, The cardiovascular safety of antiobesity drugs—analysis of signals in the FDA Adverse Event Report System Database, by Einat Gorelik et al. (including myself) analyzes the data in the FDA Adverse Continue reading The cardiovascular safety of antiobesity drugs—analysis of signals in the FDA Adverse Event Report System Database

Illustration. The word "feedback" written with white chalk on a black board

Please leave a comment to this post

Please leave a comment to this post. It doesn’t matter what, it can be a simple Hi or an interesting link. It doesn’t matter when or where you see it. I want to see how many real people are actually reading this blog.

תרשים עוגה כחלופה הולמת לגרף עמודות

Originally posted on בוריס גורליק:
תרשים עוגה כחלופה הולמת לגרף עמודות במהלך חיי המקצועיים שמעתי רבות בגנות תרשימי עוגה. הסיבה לכך נעוצה בעובדה שקל מאוד לייצר זוועות עם תרשימים אלו. לא עזרה העובדה שבמשך המון זמן ברירת המחדל של תרשימי עוגה, בכל כלי ההדמיה העיקריים, ייצרה תרשימים מעוותים לגמרי. מצדדי החרם על תרשים עוגה מציעים את גרף…

Three most common mistakes in data visualization

People ask me for good intro video to data visualization. I tend to ask them to look for one of my lectures. To save the search, here’s one of the most relevant talks that I gave This lecture was a part of 2018 EuroScipy conference, where I also ran a workshop.

Not a wasted time

Being a freelancer data scientist, I get to talk to people about proposals that don’t materialize into projects.

Which coffee is this?

Gilad Almosnino is an internationalization expert. I’m reading his post “Eight emojis that will create a more inclusive experience for Middle Eastern markets,” in which he mentions “Turkish or Arabic Coffee,” which reminded me of my last visit to Athens. When, in one restaurant, I asked for a Turkish coffee, the waiter looked at me harshly and Continue reading Which coffee is this?

Further Research is Needed

Do you believe in telepathy? Yesterday, I submitted final proofs of a paper in which I actively participated. During the proofreading, I noticed that our abstract ends with “further research is needed” and scratched my head. I submitted the proofs and then then, I saw this pearl in my blog feed

Book review: Great mental models by Shane Parrish

TL;DR shallow and disappointing The Great Mental Models by Shane Parrish was highly praised by Automattic’s CEO Matt Mullenweg. Since I appreciate Matt’s opinion a lot, I decided to buy the book. I read it and was disappointed. This book is very ambitious but yet shallow and non-engaging. If you consider reading a book on Continue reading Book review: Great mental models by Shane Parrish

Does Zipf’s Law Apply to Alzheimer’s Patients?

Originally posted on Akshay Budhkar:
? Introduction I was fascinated by Zipf’s Law when I came across it on a VSauce video. It is an empirical law that states that the frequency of occurrence of a word in a large text corpus is inversely proportional to its rank in its frequency table. The frequency distribution…

The tombs of the righteous

Some people, in face of important changes visit tombs of the righteous for a blessing. I went to see WEIZAC — Israel’s first computer (and one of the first ones in the world) that was built in 1955.

New year, new notebook

On November 7, 2016, I started an experiment in personal productivity. I decided to use a notebook for thirty days to manage all of my tasks. The thirty days ended more than three years ago, and I still use notebooks to manage myself.

Is security through obscurity back?

Yes, ML transparency opens opportunities for hacking and abuse. However, this is EXACTLY the reason why such openness is needed. Hacking attempts will not disappear with transparency removal; they will be harder to defend.

Book review. A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

TL;DR: a nice popular science book that covers many aspects of the modern science A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson is a popular science book. I didn’t learn anything fundamental out of this book, but it was worth reading. I was particularly impressed by the intrigues, lies, and manipulations behind so many Continue reading Book review. A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

Cow shit, virtual patient, big data, and the future of the human species

Yesterday, a new episode was published in the Popcorn podcast, where the host, Lior Frenkel, interviewed me. Everyone who knows me knows how much I love talking about myself and what I do. I definitely used this opportunity to talk about the world of data. Some people who listened to this episode told me that Continue reading Cow shit, virtual patient, big data, and the future of the human species

Illustration: a bunch of measurement tapes

The problem with citation count as an impact metric

Inspired by A citation is not a citation is not a citation by Lior Patcher, this rant is about metrics. Lior Patcher is a researcher in Caltech. As many other researchers in the academy, Dr. Patcher is measured by, among other things, publications and their impact as measured by citations. In his post, Lior Patcher criticised both the Continue reading The problem with citation count as an impact metric

Data visualization with statistical reasoning: seeing uncertainty with the bootstrap — Dataviz – Stats – Bayes

On Sunday, I wrote about bootstrapping. On Monday, I wrote about visualization uncertainty. Let’s now talk about bootstrapping and uncertainty visualization. Robert Grant is a data visualization expert who wrote a book about interactive data visualization (which I should read, BTW). Robert runs an interesting blog from which I learned another approach to uncertainty visualization, Continue reading Data visualization with statistical reasoning: seeing uncertainty with the bootstrap — Dataviz – Stats – Bayes

On MOOCs

When Massive Online Open Courses (a.k.a MOOCs) emerged some X years ago, I was ecstatic. I was sure that MOOCs were the Big Boom of higher education. Unfortunately, the MOOC impact turned out to be very modest. This modest impact, combined with the high production cost was one of the reasons I quit making my Continue reading On MOOCs

You don’t need a fast way to increase your reading speed by 25%. Or, don’t suppress subvocalization

Not long ago, I wrote a post about a fast hack that increased my reading speed by tracking the reading with a finger. I think that the logic behind using a tracking finger is to suppress subvocalization. I noticed that, at least in my case, suppressing subvocalization reduces the fun of reading. I actually enjoy Continue reading You don’t need a fast way to increase your reading speed by 25%. Or, don’t suppress subvocalization

Bootstrapping the right way?

Originally posted on Yanir Seroussi:
Bootstrapping the right way is a talk I gave earlier this year at the YOW! Data conference in Sydney. You can now watch the video of the talk and have a look through the slides. The content of the talk is similar to a post I published on bootstrapping pitfalls,…

How do I look like?

From time to time, people (mostly conference organizers) ask for a picture of mine. Feel free using any of these images

Visualizations with perceptual free-rides

Originally posted on richardbrath:
We create visualizations to aid viewers in making visual inferences. Different visualizations are suited to different inferences. Some visualizations offer more additional perceptual inferences over comparable visualizations. That is, the specific configuration enables additional inferences to be observed directly, without additional cognitive load. (e.g. see Gem Stapleton et al, Effective Representation…

Book review. Indistractable by Nir Eyal

Nir Eyal is known for his book “Hooked” in which he teaches how to create addictive products. In his new book “Indistractable“, Nir teaches how to live in the world full of addictive products. The book itself isn’t bad. It provides interesting information and, more importantly, practical tips and action items. Nir covers topics such Continue reading Book review. Indistractable by Nir Eyal

My blog in Hebrew

As much as I love thinking that I live in a global world, most people whom I know speak Hebrew. From time to time, someone would tell me “nice post, but why not in Hebrew?”. So, from now on, I will try to translate all my new posts to Hebrew. I will try. Not promising Continue reading My blog in Hebrew

Pseudochart. It’s like a pseudocode but for charts

Pseudocode is an informal high-level description of the operating principle of a computer program or other algorithm. People write pseudocode to isolate the “bigger picture” of an algorithm. Pseudocode doesn’t care about the particular implementation details that are secondary to the problem, such as memory management, dealing with different encoding, etc. Writing out the pseudocode Continue reading Pseudochart. It’s like a pseudocode but for charts

Illustration. The word "feedback" written with white chalk on a black board

Please leave a comment to this post

Please leave a comment to this post. It doesn’t matter what, it can be a simple Hi or an interesting link. It doesn’t matter when or where you see it. I want to see how many real people are actually reading this blog.

Word Sequentialization

Originally posted on Essays and stories:
In some ways, “data visualization” is a terrible term. It seems to reduce the construction of good charts to a mechanical procedure. It evokes the tools and methodology required to create rather than the creation itself. It’s like calling Moby-Dick a “word sequentialization” or The Starry Night a “pigment distribution.” It also reflects…