Useful redundancy — when using colors is not completely useless

The maximum data-ink ratio principle implies that one should not use colors in their graphs if the graph is understandable without the colors. The fact that you can do something, such as adding colors, doesn’t mean you should do it. I know it. I even have a dedicated tag on this blog for that. Sometimes, however, consistent use of colors serves as a useful navigation tool in a long discussion. Keep reading to learn about the justified use of colors.

Pew Research Center is a “is a nonpartisan American fact tank based in Washington, D.C. It provides information on social issues, public opinion, and demographic trends shaping the United States and the world.” Recently, I read a report prepared by the Pew Center on the religious divide in the Israeli society. This is a fascinating report. I recommend reading without any connection to data visualization.

But this post does not deal with the Isreali society but with graphs and colors.

Look at the first chart in that report. You may see a tidy pie chart with several colored segments. 

Pie chart: Religious composition of Israeli society. The chart uses several colored segments

Aha! Can’t they use a single color without losing the details? Of course the can! A monochrome pie chart would contain the same information:

Pie chart: Religious composition of Israeli society. The chart uses monochrome segments

In most of the cases, such a transformation would make a perfect sense. In most of the cases, but not in this report. This report is a multipage research document packed with many facts and analyses. The pie chart above is the first graph in that report that provides a broad overview of the Israeli society. The remaining of this report is dedicated to the relationships between and within the groups represented by the colorful segments in that pie chart. To help the reader navigating through this long report, its authors use a consistent color scheme that anchors every subsequent graph to the relevant sections of the original pie chart.

All these graphs and tables will be readable without the use of colors. Despite the fact that the colors here are redundant, this is a useful redundancy. By using the colors, the authors provided additional information layers that make the navigation within the document easier. I learned about the concept of useful redundancy from “Trees, Maps, and Theorems” by Jean-luc Dumout. If you can only read one book about data communication, it should be this book.

Meaningless slopes

That fact that you can doesn’t mean that you should! I will say it once again.That fact that you can doesn’t mean that you should! Look at this slopegraph that was featured by “Information is Beautiful”

What does it say? What do the slopes mean? It’s a slopegraph, its slopes should have a meaning. Sure, you can draw a line between one point to another but can you see the problem here? In this nonsense graph, the viewer is invited to look at slopes of lines that connect dollars with years. The proverbial “apples and oranges” are not even close to the nonsense degree of this graph. Not even close.

This page attributes this graph to National Geographic, which makes me even sadder.

 

How to make a graph less readable? Rotate the text labels

This is my “because you can” rant.

Here, you can see a typical situation. You have some sales data that you want to represent using a bar plot.

01_default

Immediately, you notice a problem: the names on the X axis are not readable. One way to make the labels readable is to enlarge the graph.02_large_image

Making larger graphs isn’t always possible. So, the next default solution is to rotate the text labels.

03_rotated

However, there is a problem. Rotated text is read more slowly than standard horizontal text. Don’t believe me? This is not an opinion but rather a result of empirical studies [ref], [ref]. Sometimes, rotated text is unavoidable. Most of the time, it is not.

So, how do we make sure all the labels are readable without rotating them? One option is to move them up and down so that they don’t hinder each other. It is easily obtained with Python’s matplotlib

plt.bar(range(len(people)), sales)
plt.title('October sales')
plt.ylabel('$US', rotation=0, ha='right')
ticks_and_labels = plt.xticks(range(len(people)), people, rotation=0)
for i, label in enumerate(ticks_and_labels[1]):
    label.set_y(label.get_position()[1] - (i % 2) * 0.05)

(note, that I also rotated the Y axis label, for even more readability)

05_alternate_labels

Another approach that will work with even longer labels and that requires fewer code lines it to rotate the bars, not the labels.

07_horizontal_plot

… and if you don’t have a compelling reason for the data order, you might also consider sorting the bars. Doing so will not only make it prettier, it will also make it easier to compare between similar values. Use the graph above to tell whether Teresa Jackson’s sales were higher or lower than those of Marie Richardson’s. Now do the same comparison using the graph below.

08_horizontal_plot_sorted

To sum up: the fact you can does not mean you should. Sometimes, rotating text labels is the easiest solution. The additional effort needed to decipher the graph is the price your audience pays for your laziness. They might as well skip your graphs your message won’t stick.

This was my because you can rant.

Featured image by Flickr user gullevek

Do you REALLY need the colors?

Seaborn is a Python visualization library based on matplotlib. It provides a high-level interface for drawing attractive statistical graphics. Look at this example from the seaborn documentation site

>>> import seaborn as sns
>>> sns.set_style("whitegrid")
>>> tips = sns.load_dataset("tips")
>>> ax = sns.barplot(x="day", y="total_bill", data=tips)

Barplot example with colored bars

This example shows the default barplot and is the first barplot. Can you see how easy it is to add colors to the different columns? But WHY? What do those colors represent? It looks like the only information that is encoded by the color is the bar category. We already have this information in the form of bar location. Having this colorful image adds nothing but a distraction. It is sad that this is the default behavior that seaborn developers decided to adopt.

Look at the same example, without the colors

>>> ax = sns.barplot(x="day", y="total_bill", color='gray', data=tips)

Barplot example with gray bars

Isn’t it much better? The sad thing is that a better version requires memorizing additional arguments and more typing.

This was my because you can rant.

 

Because you can — a new series of data visualization rants

Illustration: a cute dog

Here’s an old joke:

Q: Why do dogs lick their balls?
A: Because they can.

Canine behavior aside, the fact that you can do something doesn’t mean that you should to it. I already wrote about one such example, when I compared between chart legends to muttonchops.

Citing myself:

Chart legends are like Muttonchops — the fact that you can have them doesn’t mean you should.

Stay tuned and check the because-you-can tag.

Featured image by Unsplash user Nicolas Tessari

Chart legends and the Muttonchops

Adding legends to a graph is easy. With matplotlib, for example, you simply call plt.legend() and voilà, you have your legends. The fact that any major or minor visualization platform makes it super easy to add a legend doesn’t mean that it should be added. At least, not in graphs that are supposed to be shared with the public.

Take a look at this interesting graph taken from Reddit:

The chart provides fascinating information. However, to “decipher” it, the viewer needs to constantly switch between the chart and the legend to the right. Moreover, having to encode eight different categories, resulted in colors that are hard to distinguish. And if you happen to be a colorblind person, your chances to get the colors right are significantly lower.

What is the solution to this problem? Let’s reduce the distance between the labels and the data by putting the labels and the data together.

Notice the multiple advantages of the “after” version. First, the viewer doesn’t need to jump back-and-forth to decide which segment represents which data series. Secondly, by moving the legends inside the graph, we freed up valuable real estate area. But that’s not all. The new version is readable by the colorblind. Plus, the slightly bigger letters make the reading easier for the visually impaired. It is also readable and understandable when printed out using a black and white printer.

“Wait a minute,” you might say, “there’s not enough space for all the labels! We’ve lost some valuable information. After all,” you might say, “we now only have four labels, not eight”. Here’s the thing. I think that losing four categories is an advantage. By imposing restrictions, we are forced to decide what is it that we want to say, what is important and what is not. By forcing ourselves to only label larger chunks, we are forced to ask questions. Is the distinction between “Moustache with Muttonchops” and “Moustache with Sideburns” THAT important? If it is, make a graph about Muttonchops and Sideburns. If it’s not, combine them into a single category. Even better, combine them with “Mustache”.

Muttonchops
Muttonchops. By Flickr user GSK

Having the ability to add a legend with any number of categories, using only one code line is super convenient and useful, especially, during data exploration. However, when shared with the public, graphs need to contain as fewer legends as practically needed. Remove the legends, place the labels close to the data. If doing so results in unreadable overlapping labels, refine the graph, rethink your message, combine categories. This may take time and cause frustration, but the result might surprise you. If none of these is possible, put the legend back. At least you tried.

Chart legends are like Muttonchops — the fact that you can have them doesn’t mean you should.