Sometimes, less is better than more

Illustration: cutting instruments: knife and scissors

Today, during the EuroSciPy conference, I gave a presentation titled “Three most common mistakes in data visualization and how to avoid them”. The title of this presentation is identical to the title of the presentation that I gave in Barcelona earlier this year. The original presentation was approximately one and a half hours long. I knew that EuroSciPy presentations were expected to be shorter, so I was prepared to shorten my talk to half an hour. At some point, a couple of days before departing to Trento, I realized that I was only allocated 15 minutes. Fifteen minutes! Instead of ninety.

Frankly speaking, I was in a panic. I even considered contacting EuroSciPy organizers and asking them to remove my talk from the program. But I was too embarrassed, so I decided to take the risk and started throwing slides away. Overall, I think that I spent eight to ten working hours shortening my presentation. Today, I finally presented it. Based on the result, and on the feedback that I got from the conference audience, I now know that the 15-minutes version is better than the original, longer one. Video recording of my talk is available on Youtube and is embedded below. Below is my slide deck

 

 

Illustration image credit: Photo by Jo Szczepanska on Unsplash

An even better data visualization workshop

Boris Gorelik teaching in front of an audience.

Yesterday, I gave a data visualization workshop at EuroSciPy 2018 in Trento. I spent HOURs building and improving it. I even developed a “simple to use, easy to follow, never failing formula” for data visualization process (I’ll write about it later).

I enjoyed this workshop so much. Both preparing it, and (even more so) delivering it. There were so many useful questions and remarks. The most important remark was made by Gael Varoquaux who pointed out that one of my examples was suboptimal for vision impaired people. The embarrassing part is that one of the last lectures that I gave in my college data visualization course was about visual communication for the visually impaired. That is why the first thing I did when I came to my hotel after the workshop was to fix the error. You may find all the (corrected) material I used in this workshop on GitHub. Below, is the video of the workshop, in case you want to follow it.

 

 

 

Photo credit: picture of me delivering the workshop is by Margriet Groenendijk

Meet me at EuroSciPy 2018

EuroSciPy logo

I am excited to run a data visualization tutorial, and to give a data visualization talk during the 2018 EuroSciPy meeting in Trento, Italy.

My tutorial “Data visualization — from default and suboptimal to efficient and awesome”will take place on Sep 29 at 14:00. This is a two-hours tutorial during which I will cover between two to three examples. I will start with the default Matplotlib graph, and modify it step by step, to make a beautiful aid in technical communication. I will publish the tutorial notebooks immediately after the conference.

My talk “Three most common mistakes in data visualization” will be similar in nature to the one I gave in Barcelona this March, but more condensed and enriched with information I learned since then.

If you plan attending EuroSciPy and want to chat with me about data science, data visualization, or remote working, write a message to boris@gorelik.net.

Full conference program is available here.