Useful redundancy — when using colors is not completely useless

The maximum data-ink ratio principle implies that one should not use colors in their graphs if the graph is understandable without the colors. The fact that you can do something, such as adding colors, doesn’t mean you should do it. I know it. I even have a dedicated tag on this blog for that. Sometimes, however, consistent use of colors serves as a useful navigation tool in a long discussion. Keep reading to learn about the justified use of colors.

Pew Research Center is a “is a nonpartisan American fact tank based in Washington, D.C. It provides information on social issues, public opinion, and demographic trends shaping the United States and the world.” Recently, I read a report prepared by the Pew Center on the religious divide in the Israeli society. This is a fascinating report. I recommend reading without any connection to data visualization.

But this post does not deal with the Isreali society but with graphs and colors.

Look at the first chart in that report. You may see a tidy pie chart with several colored segments. 

Pie chart: Religious composition of Israeli society. The chart uses several colored segments

Aha! Can’t they use a single color without losing the details? Of course the can! A monochrome pie chart would contain the same information:

Pie chart: Religious composition of Israeli society. The chart uses monochrome segments

In most of the cases, such a transformation would make a perfect sense. In most of the cases, but not in this report. This report is a multipage research document packed with many facts and analyses. The pie chart above is the first graph in that report that provides a broad overview of the Israeli society. The remaining of this report is dedicated to the relationships between and within the groups represented by the colorful segments in that pie chart. To help the reader navigating through this long report, its authors use a consistent color scheme that anchors every subsequent graph to the relevant sections of the original pie chart.

All these graphs and tables will be readable without the use of colors. Despite the fact that the colors here are redundant, this is a useful redundancy. By using the colors, the authors provided additional information layers that make the navigation within the document easier. I learned about the concept of useful redundancy from “Trees, Maps, and Theorems” by Jean-luc Dumout. If you can only read one book about data communication, it should be this book.

Microtext Line Charts

Why adding text labels to graph lines, when you can build graph lines using text labels? On microtext lines

richardbrath

Tangled Lines

Line charts are a staple of data visualization. They’ve existed at least since William Playfair and possibly earlier. Like many charts, they can be very powerful and also have their limitations. One limitation is the number of lines that can be displayed. One line works well: you can see trend, volatility, highs, lows, reversals. Two lines provides opportunity for comparison. 5 lines might be getting crowded. 10 lines and you’re starting to run out of colors. But what if the task is to compare across a peer group of 30 or 40 items? Lines get jumbled, there aren’t enough discrete colors, legends can’t clearly distinguish between them. Consider this example looking at unemployment across 37 countries from the OECD: which country had the lowest unemployment in 2010?

unemployment_plain

Tooltips are an obvious way to solve this, but tooltips have problems – they are much slower than just shifing visual attention…

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איך אומרים דאטה ויזואליזיישן בעברית?

This post is written in Hebrew about a Hebrew issue. I won’t translate it to English.

אני מלמד data visualization בשתי מכללות בישראלבמכללת עזריאלי להנדסה בירושלים ובמכון הטכנולוגי בחולון. כשכתבתי את הסילבוס הראשון שלי הייתי צריך למצוא מונח ל־data visualization וכתבתיהדמיית נתונים״ אומנם זה הזכיר לי קצת תהליך של סימולציה, אבל האופציה האחרת ששקלתי היתה ״דימות״ וידעתי שהיא שמורה ל־imaging, דהיינו תהליך של יצירת דמות או צורה של עצם, בעיקר בעולם הרפואה.

הבנתי שהמונח בעייתי בשיעור הראשון שהעברתי. מסתברששניים מארבעת הסטודנטים שהגיעו לשיעור חשבו שקורס ״הדמיית נתונים בתהליך מחקר ופיתוח״ מדבר על סימולציות.

מתישהו שמעתי מחבר של חבר שהמונח הנכון ל־visualization זה הדמאה, אבל זה נשמע לי פלצני מדי, אז השארתי את ה־״הדמיה״ בשם הקורס והוספתי “data visualization” בסוגריים.

היום, שלוש שנים אחרי ההרצאה הראשונה שהעברתי, ויומיים לפני פתיחת הסמסטר הבא, החלטתי לגגל (יש מילה כזאת? יש!) את התשובה. ומה מסתבר? עלון ״למד לשונך״ מס׳ 109 של האקדמיה ללשון עברית שיצא לאור בשנת 2015 קובע שהמונח ל־visualization הוא הַחְזָיָה. לא יודע מה אתכם, אבל אני לא משתגע על החזיה. עוד משהו שאני לא משתגע עליו הוא שבתור הדוגמא להחזיה, האקדמיה החלטיה לשים תרשים עוגה עם כל כך הרבה שגיאות!

Screen Shot 2018-10-23 at 20.35.52

נראה לי שאני אשאר עם הדמיה. ויקימילון מרשה לי.

נ.ב. שמתם לב שפוסט זה השתמשתי במקף עברי? אני מאוד אוהב את המקף העברי.

Data visualization in right-to-left languages

Line chart that uses Arabic text and numerals

If you speak Arabic or Farsi, I need your help. If you don’t speak, share this post with someone who does.

Right-to-left (RTL) languages such as Hebrew, Arabic, and Farsi are used by roughly 1.8 billion people around the world. Many of them consume data in their native languages. Nevertheless, I have never seen any research or study that explores data visualization in RTL languages. Until a couple of days ago, when I saw this interesting observation by Nick Doiron “Charts when you read right-to-left“.

I teach data visualization in Israeli colleges. Whenever a student asks me RTL-related questions, I always answer something like “it’s complicated, let’s not deal with that”. Moreover, in the assignments, I even allow my students to submit graphs in English, even if they write the report in Hebrew.

Nick’s post made me wonder about data visualization do’s and don’ts in RTL environments. Should Hebrew charts differ from Arabic or Farsi? What are the accepted practices?

If you speak Arabic or Farsi, I need your help. If you don’t speak, share this post with someone who does. I want to collect as many examples of data visualization in RTL languages. Links to research articles are more than welcome. You can leave your comments here or send them to boris@gorelik.net.

Thank you.

 

The image at the top of this post is a modified version of a graph that appears in the post that I cite. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to find the original publication.

Graphing Highly Skewed Data – Tom Hopper

screenshot of three graphs: two bar plots and one dot plot with a split graph area

My colleague, Chares Earl, pointed me to this interesting 2010 post that explores different ways to visualize categories of drastically different sizes.

The post author, Tom Hopper, experiments with different ways to deal with “Data Giraffes”. Some of his experiments are really interesting (such as splitting the graph area). In one experiment, Tom Hopper draws bar chart on a log scale. Doing so is considered as a bad practice. Bar charts value (Y) axis must include meaningful zero, which log scale can’t have by its definition.

Other than that, a good read Graphing Highly Skewed Data – Tom Hopper

Sometimes, less is better than more

Illustration: cutting instruments: knife and scissors

Today, during the EuroSciPy conference, I gave a presentation titled “Three most common mistakes in data visualization and how to avoid them”. The title of this presentation is identical to the title of the presentation that I gave in Barcelona earlier this year. The original presentation was approximately one and a half hours long. I knew that EuroSciPy presentations were expected to be shorter, so I was prepared to shorten my talk to half an hour. At some point, a couple of days before departing to Trento, I realized that I was only allocated 15 minutes. Fifteen minutes! Instead of ninety.

Frankly speaking, I was in a panic. I even considered contacting EuroSciPy organizers and asking them to remove my talk from the program. But I was too embarrassed, so I decided to take the risk and started throwing slides away. Overall, I think that I spent eight to ten working hours shortening my presentation. Today, I finally presented it. Based on the result, and on the feedback that I got from the conference audience, I now know that the 15-minutes version is better than the original, longer one. Video recording of my talk is available on Youtube and is embedded below. Below is my slide deck

 

 

Illustration image credit: Photo by Jo Szczepanska on Unsplash

An even better data visualization workshop

Boris Gorelik teaching in front of an audience.

Yesterday, I gave a data visualization workshop at EuroSciPy 2018 in Trento. I spent HOURs building and improving it. I even developed a “simple to use, easy to follow, never failing formula” for data visualization process (I’ll write about it later).

I enjoyed this workshop so much. Both preparing it, and (even more so) delivering it. There were so many useful questions and remarks. The most important remark was made by Gael Varoquaux who pointed out that one of my examples was suboptimal for vision impaired people. The embarrassing part is that one of the last lectures that I gave in my college data visualization course was about visual communication for the visually impaired. That is why the first thing I did when I came to my hotel after the workshop was to fix the error. You may find all the (corrected) material I used in this workshop on GitHub. Below, is the video of the workshop, in case you want to follow it.

 

 

 

Photo credit: picture of me delivering the workshop is by Margriet Groenendijk

Meet me at EuroSciPy 2018

EuroSciPy logo

I am excited to run a data visualization tutorial, and to give a data visualization talk during the 2018 EuroSciPy meeting in Trento, Italy.

My tutorial “Data visualization — from default and suboptimal to efficient and awesome”will take place on Sep 29 at 14:00. This is a two-hours tutorial during which I will cover between two to three examples. I will start with the default Matplotlib graph, and modify it step by step, to make a beautiful aid in technical communication. I will publish the tutorial notebooks immediately after the conference.

My talk “Three most common mistakes in data visualization” will be similar in nature to the one I gave in Barcelona this March, but more condensed and enriched with information I learned since then.

If you plan attending EuroSciPy and want to chat with me about data science, data visualization, or remote working, write a message to boris@gorelik.net.

Full conference program is available here.

Value-Suppressing Uncertainty Palettes – UW Interactive Data Lab – Medium

Value-Suppressing Uncertainty Palette

Uncertainty is one of the most neglected aspects of number-based communication and one of the most important concepts in general numeracy. Comprehending uncertainty is hard. Visualizing it is, apparently, even harder.

Last week I read a paper called Value-Suppressing Uncertainty Palettes, by M.Correll, D. Moritz, and J. Heer from the Data visualization and interactive analysis research at the University of Washington. This paper describes an interesting approach to color-encoding uncertainty.

Value-Suppressing Uncertainty Palette

Uncertainty visualization is commonly done by reducing color saturation and opacity.  Cornell et al suggest combining saturation reduction with limiting the number of possible colors in a color palette. Unfortunately, there the authors used Javascript and not python for this paper, which means that in the future, I might try implementing it in python.

Two figures visualizing poll data over the USA map, using different approaches to visualize uncertainty

 

Visualizing uncertainty is one of the most challenging tasks in data visualization. Uncertain

 

via Value-Suppressing Uncertainty Palettes – UW Interactive Data Lab – Medium